what are you waiting for?

Waiting is a common enough theme in this blog that I probably should make a category or at least a tag for it.  Here are some of the things I’ve been waiting for lately.

  • Waiting for Human Resources to process (i.e. find ways/reasons to deny) my health accommodation requests.
  • Waiting for an appointment with my primary care (this Wednesday) to go over the most recent documentation request from HR – I made an appointment  this time because of all the fruitless waiting I did last Fall with the initial set of accommodation physician documentation forms.
  • Waiting for results from my rather difficult to time 24 urine and “while you’re symptomatic” blood draw for histamine by products.  I have an  appointment this Friday, which I am trying to change to earlier so I don’t miss quite so much work, and so add to this list…
  • …waiting for the Endocrine clinic at B.A.T.H. to call me back.
  • Waiting for an EMG (also this Wednesday) on my totally screwed up right hand/wrist, which I totally screwed up by overuse at work and by waiting to too long to get it checked out.  It’s now not just an acute injury.  It’s a new trick for my body to do.
  • Waiting for an appointment with some genetics doc (next Wednesday) …this came out of the January appointment when I popped my hip out of joint getting out of the car, ended up being tacked on to the schedule of a Rheumatologist my primary care shares his office space with sometimes, and referred for checking out of the whole super bendiness/spontaneous dislocating/subluxing (subluxating?) stuff.  The appointment is to evaluate me (genetically) for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.  I haven’t decided about whether to mention testing for a RET gene mutation – maybe I will ask my primary care about this on Wednesday.

What made me think of waiting was a post on Professor Lisa Gualtieri’s blog, which seems a decent blog.  I found it through an old article in the Boston Globe which was a recruitment call for patient bloggers for a survey research study (now closed, but a slide show of findings is here).  In her post Must waiting be inherent to medical care?, she gives what I guess can be called a taxonomy of waiting which patients experience.  Yup, seems right.  My least favorite part is the final step, “loop”.  That one kills me.

My strategies for waiting to be seen once I’m there include the following:

  • My primary care’s office is always backed up.  However, they are very good about letting you know how far behind they are if you call ahead.  I find this to be a good solution, and I respect that they are behind because my primary care has a lot of complicated patients and because he doesn’t rush through appointments with us.
  • I bring something to read, something to work on, something to play with, or someone to talk to.  I have played countless games of solitaire; written numerous pages of journal entries, letters, or poems; drawn on my iPad; listened to downloaded podcasts or episodes of shows like This American Life (interesting and informative).  It helps.  I feel bad for people who do not have access to mobile devices or engaging diversionary materials (e.g. books instead of insipid waiting room magazines), which help pass the time.  I have often wondered about starting some kind of book/tech drive at waiting rooms – E.R.s, O.R.s, and ICUs specifically.   One day, when I am not working, I  think this will be a project of mine.
  • I manage my expectations.  I do not expect to be in and out fast.  I think that this is easier, or at least comes more readily, for those of us with chronic illnesses.  We sort of learn to discard the stresses that we can, because there are so damned many of them.  If we let a one hour wait in the doctor’s office drive us over the edge, we’d have no resource left over for all the other things that are stressful in our lives.  This isn’t to say that it doesn’t get to us.  It does, but I think that if one were to calculate a “per visit freakout” ratio, one may find that the people in the many years chronically ill group inclined towards the lower side.  Dunno for sure, just a hypothesis.

So, what are YOU waiting for? How do you deal with waiting in medical contexts?  Have you found that your chronic illness has made you better or worse at being a patient patient?

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2 Comments

  1. I’m waiting to become a famous novelist.. What, you mean waiting’s not enough! Bugger! No, actually, waitings’ a pain, there’s a great Dr Seuss poem about it somewhere, with accompanying pics of miserable looking people in lines waiting for everything conceivable. If you gotta wait, the thing is to think of something to do meanwhile – I carry a notepad around and write story ideas. Good luck with the meds!

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